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Illinois, Monroe

Severe Thunderstorm Watch

Statement as of 4:03 PM CDT on May 27, 2017

Expires 10:00 PM EDT on May 27, 2017


Severe Thunderstorm Watch 276 remains in effect until 900 PM CDT
for the following locations


IL
. Illinois counties included are

Alexander Clinton Edwards
Franklin Gallatin Hamilton
Hardin Jackson Jefferson
Johnson Madison Marion
Massac Monroe Perry
Pope Pulaski Randolph
St. Clair Saline Union
Wabash Washington Wayne
white Williamson




Public Information Statement

Statement as of 1:54 PM CDT on May 27, 2017

Expires 7:45 PM EDT on May 28, 2017


... Safety rules for severe thunderstorms...

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch has been issued by the National
Weather Service. In the interest of public safety, the
following safety rules are provided. Public and commercial
broadcast stations serving the affected area are asked to
broadcast these safety measures frequently while the watch is
in effect.

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch means conditions are favorable for
the development of severe thunderstorms in and close to the
watch area. If you are in the watch area, keep up to date of
the latest weather information. These storms can develop
rapidly so there may be occasions when advance warning is not
possible.

A Severe Thunderstorm Warning means a severe thunderstorm has
been observed or indicated on radar. If you are in the path
or near the storm, take immediate actions to protect life and
property. Follow these safety rules:

(1) in open country, you should seek shelter and avoid trees
which can be targets for lightning. If there is no shelter,
go to a ditch or culvert but beware of rising water which can
cause flooding.

(2) when indoors, stay away from outside walls and windows
and go to an interior room on the lowest level. Avoid using
electrical appliances while the storm is nearby.

(3) in Mobile homes, you should leave and seek nearby safe
shelter.

(4) if swimming or on a boat, you should get to shore as
quickly as possible and find shelter.

A thunderstorm is considered severe when it contains one inch
or larger diameter size hail and/or wind gusts of 58 miles an
hour or greater. A severe thunderstorm can also produce deadly
lightning and very heavy rain which can lead to flash flooding.

Remember, with any severe thunderstorm there is always the
possibility of tornadoes.


Gks


154 PM CDT Sat may 27 2017

... Safety rules for severe thunderstorms...

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch has been issued by the National
Weather Service. In the interest of public safety, the
following safety rules are provided. Public and commercial
broadcast stations serving the affected area are asked to
broadcast these safety measures frequently while the watch is
in effect.

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch means conditions are favorable for
the development of severe thunderstorms in and close to the
watch area. If you are in the watch area, keep up to date of
the latest weather information. These storms can develop
rapidly so there may be occasions when advance warning is not
possible.

A Severe Thunderstorm Warning means a severe thunderstorm has
been observed or indicated on radar. If you are in the path
or near the storm, take immediate actions to protect life and
property. Follow these safety rules:

(1) in open country, you should seek shelter and avoid trees
which can be targets for lightning. If there is no shelter,
go to a ditch or culvert but beware of rising water which can
cause flooding.

(2) when indoors, stay away from outside walls and windows
and go to an interior room on the lowest level. Avoid using
electrical appliances while the storm is nearby.

(3) in Mobile homes, you should leave and seek nearby safe
shelter.

(4) if swimming or on a boat, you should get to shore as
quickly as possible and find shelter.

A thunderstorm is considered severe when it contains one inch
or larger diameter size hail and/or wind gusts of 58 miles an
hour or greater. A severe thunderstorm can also produce deadly
lightning and very heavy rain which can lead to flash flooding.

Remember, with any severe thunderstorm there is always the
possibility of tornadoes.


Gks

845 am CDT Mon may 15 2017


To: family of services /fos/ subscribers...
         NOAA weather wire service /nwws/ subscribers...
         emergency managers... weather information network
         /emwin/ subscribers... noaaport subscribers...
         other National Weather Service /NWS/ users and
         partners... and NWS employees.

From: mark Fuchs
         service hydrologist

Subject: introducing three New River forecast points in the Saint
         Louis hydrologic service area

As of this morning, the National Weather Service office in Saint
Louis, Missouri is providing new forecast services for three river
gaging locations in Missouri.

At the confluence of the Osage and Maries rivers east of Jefferson
City, flood-only forecast services will begin for mari-Osa
campground. Flood-only means forecast services will only be
provided when forecast or observed stages are above action stage,
typically a couple of feet below flood stage, or higher. At this
site, flood stage is 19 feet. Moderate flooding begins at 22 feet,
while major flooding begins at 25 feet. Flood impacts in this reach
of river include damages to agricultural fields, campgrounds, local
roads, and residences along the riverfront. This area experienced
its greatest flood of recent memory during the flood of late
December, 2015, when the river crested at 30.3 feet. Earlier this
month, the river crested at 27.9 feet on may 4th.

Along the Meramec river in south St. Louis County, flood-only
forecast services will begin for the New River gage at Fenton,
Missouri. This gage was installed by the United States geological
survey in cooperation with the metropolitan St. Louis sewer district
in January 2016. Flood stage at Fenton is 25 feet. Moderate
flooding begins at 29 feet, and major flooding begins at 32 feet.
Flood impacts in the Fenton area are primarily urban, with numerous
streets, businesses, and residences impacted by floodwaters. The
last two significant floods at this location are likely the greatest
floods of at least the past century. The flood of record occurred
on new year's eve 2015, when the Meramec crested at 42.86 feet.
Earlier this month, the Meramec river crested at 41.88 feet, only a
foot below the flood of record.

Along the upper Mississippi River between Quincy, Illinois and
Canton, Missouri, daily river forecast servies will begin for the
New River gage at La Grange, Missouri. This gage was installed by
the U.S. Army corps of engineers-Rock Island district last Summer.
Flood stage is 18 feet. Moderate flooding begins at 23 feet, and
major flooding begins at 25 feet. Signficant urban impacts occur
throughout the town of La Grange along with agricultural impacts
north and south of town. The greatest flood of recent memory
occurred with the flood of 1993, when the river crested near 30
feet.

Flood stage is the river level at which minimal human impact from
floodwaters begins, and the level the National Weather Service uses
as a threhold for issuing river flood warnings. Moderate and major
flood stages are levels at which human impact increases noticably.
At moderate levels, numerous secondary roads are often inundated and
some outbuildings may be flooded. At major levels, primary roads
and highways can become flooded along with residences and
businesses.

In addition to forecasts and observations, impact information, data
on past flood events, and additional information can be found at the
St. Louis advanced hydrologic prediction service (ahps) website at
water.Weather.Gov/ahps2/index.Php?Wfo=lsx.

The National Weather Service welcomes public feedback. If you have
any questions or comments regarding these service improvements,
please contact:

Mark Fuchs
service hydrologist
National Weather Service forecast office - St. Louis, Missouri
12 Missouri research park drive
St. Charles, MO 63304
phone: (636) 447-1876 extension 493


Fuchs


845 am CDT Mon may 15 2017


To: family of services /fos/ subscribers...
         NOAA weather wire service /nwws/ subscribers...
         emergency managers... weather information network
         /emwin/ subscribers... noaaport subscribers...
         other National Weather Service /NWS/ users and
         partners... and NWS employees.

From: mark Fuchs
         service hydrologist

Subject: introducing three New River forecast points in the Saint
         Louis hydrologic service area

As of this morning, the National Weather Service office in Saint
Louis, Missouri is providing new forecast services for three river
gaging locations in Missouri.

At the confluence of the Osage and Maries rivers east of Jefferson
City, flood-only forecast services will begin for mari-Osa
campground. Flood-only means forecast services will only be
provided when forecast or observed stages are above action stage,
typically a couple of feet below flood stage, or higher. At this
site, flood stage is 19 feet. Moderate flooding begins at 22 feet,
while major flooding begins at 25 feet. Flood impacts in this reach
of river include damages to agricultural fields, campgrounds, local
roads, and residences along the riverfront. This area experienced
its greatest flood of recent memory during the flood of late
December, 2015, when the river crested at 30.3 feet. Earlier this
month, the river crested at 27.9 feet on may 4th.

Along the Meramec river in south St. Louis County, flood-only
forecast services will begin for the New River gage at Fenton,
Missouri. This gage was installed by the United States geological
survey in cooperation with the metropolitan St. Louis sewer district
in January 2016. Flood stage at Fenton is 25 feet. Moderate
flooding begins at 29 feet, and major flooding begins at 32 feet.
Flood impacts in the Fenton area are primarily urban, with numerous
streets, businesses, and residences impacted by floodwaters. The
last two significant floods at this location are likely the greatest
floods of at least the past century. The flood of record occurred
on new year's eve 2015, when the Meramec crested at 42.86 feet.
Earlier this month, the Meramec river crested at 41.88 feet, only a
foot below the flood of record.

Along the upper Mississippi River between Quincy, Illinois and
Canton, Missouri, daily river forecast servies will begin for the
New River gage at La Grange, Missouri. This gage was installed by
the U.S. Army corps of engineers-Rock Island district last Summer.
Flood stage is 18 feet. Moderate flooding begins at 23 feet, and
major flooding begins at 25 feet. Signficant urban impacts occur
throughout the town of La Grange along with agricultural impacts
north and south of town. The greatest flood of recent memory
occurred with the flood of 1993, when the river crested near 30
feet.

Flood stage is the river level at which minimal human impact from
floodwaters begins, and the level the National Weather Service uses
as a threhold for issuing river flood warnings. Moderate and major
flood stages are levels at which human impact increases noticably.
At moderate levels, numerous secondary roads are often inundated and
some outbuildings may be flooded. At major levels, primary roads
and highways can become flooded along with residences and
businesses.

In addition to forecasts and observations, impact information, data
on past flood events, and additional information can be found at the
St. Louis advanced hydrologic prediction service (ahps) website at
water.Weather.Gov/ahps2/index.Php?Wfo=lsx.

The National Weather Service welcomes public feedback. If you have
any questions or comments regarding these service improvements,
please contact:

Mark Fuchs
service hydrologist
National Weather Service forecast office - St. Louis, Missouri
12 Missouri research park drive
St. Charles, MO 63304
phone: (636) 447-1876 extension 493


Fuchs

Weather Severe Map
Alaska - Special Statement , Record Report
Arkansas - Tornado Watch , Flood Warning , Areal Flood Watch , Flood Advisory
California - Areal Flood Advisory , Public Information Statement
Colorado - Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flood Advisory , Special Statement
Connecticut - Coastal Flood Statement , Coastal Flood Advisory , Public Information Statement
Delaware - Coastal Flood Advisory
District of Columbia - Public Information Statement
Florida - Fire Weather Warning , Fire Weather Watch, Fire Weather Warning , Fire Weather Watch
Hawaii - High Surf Advisory , Special Statement
Idaho - Flood Warning, Areal Flood Warning , Areal Flood Warning , Flood Warning , Flood Advisory
Illinois - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flood Warning , Flood Watch , Public Information Statement , Public Information Statement
Indiana - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flood Warning , Areal Flood Advisory , Special Statement , Public Information Statement , Public Information Statement
Iowa - Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flood Warning , Flood Watch , Special Statement
Kansas - Tornado Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flash Flood Warning , Flood Warning , Flash Flood Watch
Kentucky - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flood Warning , Flash Flood Warning , Flash Flood Watch , Areal Flood Advisory, Flash Flood Watch , Areal Flood Advisory , Special Statement , Public Information Statement
Louisiana - Flood Warning
Maine - Coastal Flood Statement
Maryland - Coastal Flood Advisory
Massachusetts - Coastal Flood Statement
Michigan - Public Information Statement
Minnesota - Flood Warning
Mississippi - Flood Warning , Flood Advisory
Missouri - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Tornado Warning , Tornado Warning , Tornado Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flood Warning , Flash Flood Warning , Flash Flood Watch , Flood Advisory , Public Information Statement , Public Information Statement
Montana - Lake Wind Advisory , Record Report
Nevada - Areal Flood Warning , Flood Warning , Areal Flood Advisory
New Hampshire - Coastal Flood Statement
New Jersey - Coastal Flood Advisory , Coastal Flood Statement
New Mexico - Wind Advisory , Fire Weather Warning
New York - Coastal Flood Advisory , Coastal Flood Statement
North Carolina - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Flood Warning , Special Statement , Public Information Statement
North Dakota -
Ohio - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Flash Flood Warning , Flood Warning , Areal Flood Advisory , Special Statement , Public Information Statement
Oklahoma - Tornado Watch , Areal Flood Watch , Areal Flood Watch, Flood Advisory , Heat Advisory
Puerto Rico - Flood Watch, Areal Flood Advisory
South Carolina - Flood Warning
Tennessee - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flood Advisory
Texas - Flood Warning , High Wind Warning , Heat Advisory , Fire Weather Warning , Special Statement , Beach Hazard Statement , Record Report
Utah - Areal Flood Watch
Virginia - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flood Warning , Flash Flood Watch , Special Statement
Washington - Flood Warning , Flood Watch
West Virginia - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Flash Flood Watch
Wisconsin - Flood Warning
- Severe Thunderstorm Watch

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